Alpha Video

The Phantom Fiend

Jack the Ripper stalks London in this classic version of "The Lodger."
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The Phantom Fiend
25% OFF
Rating 3.0
8 ratings
Movie on IMDb
Out of Print: Future availability is unknown
Item:  ALP 5860D
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DVD Features:

  • Rated: Not Rated
  • Run Time: 1 hours, 2 minutes
  • Video: Black & White
  • Released:
  • Originally Released: 1931
  • Label: Alpha Video
  • Encoding: Region 0 (Worldwide)
  • Audio:
    • Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo - English

Performers, Cast and Crew:

Starring , , &
Directed by
Screenwriting by , , &
Produced by
Director of Photography: &

Description by OLDIES.com:

A bloodthirsty killer is terrorizing the streets of London leaving a dozen women dead. George Bunting warns his pretty young daughter, Daisy, not to walk the evening streets alone. Times are hard and the Bunting family is delighted when a young musician, Michel Angeloff, rents the spare room in their modest home. Mesmerized by his delightful piano playing, Daisy spends more and more time with the sad mysterious lodger. But as Scotland Yard's investigation reveals more details about the fiendish murderer, Bunting is horrified when he realizes the police seem to be describing the very man who is romancing his daughter - Michel!

The Phantom Fiend is the first sound version of the Jack the Ripper inspired tale, The Lodger. Leading man Ivor Novello, who had starred in Alfred Hitchcock's 1927 silent version, first gained fame and fortune during World War I when he composed the anthem, "Keep The Home Fires Burning." He continued his successful career acting, writing music and plays up until his death at age 58 in 1951.

Product Description:

In Belloc-Lowndes' original novel THE LODGER, the reclusive young man suspected of being Jack the Ripper turns out to be exactly who he's assumed to be. When Alfred Hitchcock directed the 1926 film version of THE LODGER, he was advised that the public would never accept the popular star Ivor Novello as a serial killer, thus the film was given a happy ending. Novello himself wrote the screenplay for the 1932 non-Hitchcock talkie version of THE LODGER, which, though updated from the novel's 19th century setting, retains its original shocker climax. Well received at the time of its release but rarely seen in recent years, the 1932 LODGER can be regarded as a serviceable bridge between the 1926 Hitchcock silent and the definitive 1944 20th Century-Fox remake starring Laird Cregar.

Plot Keywords:

Mistaken Identity | Murder | Serial Killers | Thriller

Movie Lovers' Ratings & Reviews:

Customer Rating: Rating 3.0
Based on 8 ratings.
Write an online review to share your thoughts with other customers.
Rating 1.5 DVD is struck from a terrible print Movie Lover: from WORTHINGTON, OH US -- October, 12, 2011

Beware of this DVD as video quality is abysmal. There are large chunks of this film that are virtually grey screens. Some of this is due to the staging of the scenes where the streets are fog laden but most of the problem is the print is in dreadful condition. Massive jump-cuts and audio drop outs add to the frustration. Not a bad script and worth a look just to hear how silent star Ivor Novello really sounded. Too bad the video quality is wretched.


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Product Info:

  • UPC: 089218586094
  • Shipping Weight: 0.21/lbs (approx)
  • International Shipping: 1 item

Top ranking DVD:

Film Collectors & Archivists: Alpha Video is actively looking for rare and unusual pre-1943 motion pictures, in good condition, from Monogram, PRC, Tiffany, Chesterfield, and other independent studios for release on DVD. We are also interested in TV shows from the early 1950s. Share your passion for films with a large audience. Let us know what you have.