Alpha Video

50s TV Comedy (10-DVD)

10-DVD set chock-full of 45 classic episodes of television comedy!
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DVD  (10 Discs)
Item:  ALP 2032D
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DVD Features:

  • Number of Discs: 10
  • Rated: Not Rated
  • Run Time: 12 hours
  • Video: Black & White
  • Released:
  • Originally Released: 2010
  • Label: Alpha Video
  • Encoding: Region 0 (Worldwide)

Performers, Cast and Crew:

Starring , , , , , , , , , , , , &
Comedian:
Featured:
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Description by OLDIES.com:

Jack Benny Show, Volume 1 (ALP 4252D): America's funniest cheapskate appears in four episodes featuring musical performances and celebrity guests. Join the always beleaguered Benny and featured regulars Mary Livingston, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson and Don Wilson in a series of side-splitting comic situations.

Episode 1: In a series of flashbacks, Jack recalls his first meeting with Mary, who is working as a clerk in a department store and his feeble attempts to ask her for a date.

Episode 2: Jack plans to dramatize his life story on the show. An adorable boy shows up to audition for the part as Jack as a child, but his ruthless agent demands $2000 to hire his client!

Episode 3: Jack is about to introduce singer Bob Crosby when he is interrupted by a precocious young girl asking for an autograph who insists that her name is Margaret Truman and that she lives in Washington DC!

Episode 4: Jack visits the show's sponsor to renew his contract. What Jack doesn't know is that the scheming Fred Allen is trying to convince the company that Benny should be fired and he should be the new star! In a surprise appearance, Eddie Cantor suddenly enters to turn the tables on both Benny and Allen!

Topper, Volume 1 (ALP 4260D): Following the success of the Topper movies, the well-loved characters created by Thorne Smith were brought to life on the small screen from 1953-1956. When the ghosts of George and Marion Kirby return to their home after dying in a skiing accident, they discover the house is now occupied by uptight banker Cosmo Topper and his wife. Visible only to Cosmo, the Kirbys cause unending trouble in their attempts to teach him to enjoy life. One of the show's young screenwriters, Stephen Sondheim, would go on to greater fame as lyricist for such major musicals as "West Side Story." Several episodes contain the original commercials.

Episode 1: Afraid that George and Marion will spoil his vacation, Topper makes the ghosts promise not to follow them. As Cosmo and Henrietta settle into their suite, maniacal laughter haunts the couple, forcing Cosmo to call on the Kirbys to chase away the evil spirits.

Episode 2: During a trip to Las Vegas, a casino detective mistakes Topper for a notorious card cheat and sets out to catch him in the act. When the Kirbys offer a little "help" at the tables, the investigator's suspicions appear to come true.

Episode 3: Topper's goddaughter falls in love with a movie star and asks Cosmo to host a dinner for the pair. When George finds out the young woman is an old girlfriend, he sets out to ruin the dinner and break up the couple.

Episode 4: Henrietta decides the house is too big and sells it to a family without asking Cosmo. Outraged, George and Marion try to chase away the new tenants.

You Bet Your Life, Volume 1 (ALP 4335D): Groucho Marx matches wits with the American public in four episodes of this classic game show. Starting on the radio in 1947, "You Bet Your Life" made its television debut in 1950 and aired for 11 years with Groucho as host and emcee. Sponsored rather conspicuously by the Dodge DeSoto car manufacturers, the show featured two contestants working as a team to answer questions for cash prizes. Another mainstay of these question and answer segments was the paper mache duck that would descend from the ceiling with one hundred dollars in tow whenever a player uttered the "secret word." The quiz show aspect of "You Bet Your Life" was always secondary, to the clever back-and-forth between host and contestant, which found Groucho at his funniest. It's in these interview segments that "You Bet Your Life" truly makes its mark as one of early television's greatest programs.

Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, Volume 1 (ALP 4422D): These four hilarious episodes about "America's Favorite Family" span 14 years of our national fascination with the Nelsons - a reminder of all the gentle humor and whacky situations that centered around their home, their neighborhood and favorite malt shop.

Episode 1: Harriet organizes a social dance at the Women's Club and invites 20 little girls in party dresses. Ozzie volunteers to supply the young, neighborhood boys for the social - but he soon discovers that the little kids would much rather be playing baseball than dancing.

Episode 2: The Nelsons are getting worried. It's been almost two weeks since David and his wife called or visited. But, in an effort not to appear too "snoopy" Ozzie and Harriet dream up an imaginative way to "keep in touch."

Episode 3: It's David Nelson's first day back at the law office following his honeymoon and trying to keep his newlywed romance in full swing hardly seems possible with such a busy work schedule.

Episode 4: Ozzie is scheduled to deliver a lecture to the Men's Club on "The Importance Of Keeping Organized And Being On Time" only he forgets the appointment, gets to the banquet hall late and winds up delivering the lecture - to the wrong audience.

George Burns & Gracie Allen Show, Volume 1 (ALP 4731D): Since becoming a vaudeville team in 1922, George Burns and Gracie Allen have made audiences laugh in movies, radio and television. The real-life married couple established their personalities in radio with "The Burns and Allen Show" and brought their comedy to television in 1950. For nine years on CBS, every show opened with Burns, puffing his trademark cigar, regaling the audience with stories of their vaudeville days... and the latest antics of his beloved wife, Gracie. Often entangled with their neighbors the Morton's, Gracie's zany wit was always the cause (and solution) to their misadventures of domestic bliss.

When Gracie passed away in 1964, George continued to entertain in his inimitable style for another 32 years, even winning an Oscar in 1976 for his performance in The Sunshine Boys. George lived to be 100 and always credited Gracie with "being the talented one." As George would say after each classic episode, "Say goodnight, Gracie."

Includes eight classic episodes!

Private Secretary, Volume 1 (ALP 4755D): Ann Sothern is Susie, private secretary to talent agent Peter Sands (Don Porter), in this delightful series of comic adventures that ran on TV Sunday nights from 1953 to 1957. Susie, with long-suffering receptionist Vi Praskins (Ann Tyrrell), keeps the office of International Artists humming in the world of insecure actors, snobby writers and big-shot producers, while continuing to prove that the employees are often smarter than their employer! "Private Secretary" (AKA "Susie") was nominated for five Emmy Awards and continues to enchant all who come under Susie's lively secretarial spell.

What Every Secretary Knows: Peter desperately wants to make a deal for two of his rising singing stars with an opera impresario. Susie and the maestro's wife plot to get the two bigheaded big shots together.

How To Handle a Boss: Susie busts her writer's block when she asks a reporter friend to "ghost write" an article for her in a magazine. The result lands her in hot water with everybody in the office!

Not Quite Paradise: Vi's Aunt Martha gets the crazy idea that her niece and Peter are engaged to be married - and that Susie is the competition that must be eliminated!

Three's A Crowd: Susie finds herself in the role of "leading lady" in a love triangle with a new, eager-to-please playwright and a slick Broadway producer.

My Hero, Volume 1 (ALP 4784D): Women find handsome and carefree Robert S. Beanblossom (Bob Cummings) irresistible. Perhaps that is why such a clueless real estate salesman is a hero in the eyes of secretary Julie Marshall (Julie Bishop). Boss Willis Thackery (John Litel) sees things differently and tries to reign in Beanblossom's bumbling antics. In spite of his efforts, Mr. Thackery's small Hollywood firm is the scene of a never ending parade of uproarious adventures. Loyal side-kick Julie always tries to fix Beanblossom's unwitting slip-ups, but only seems to makes things worse and a whole lot funnier. This early television sitcom is the first of four starring Bob Cummings that include "Love That Bob," "The Bob Cummings Show" and "My Living Doll."

Model Of Blossom: A beautiful photographer uses Beanblossom to pose for a magazine layout featuring one of Mr. Thackery's model homes. Her designs on Julie's harebrained hero quickly turn to romance, prompting an incredible mix-up.

Beauty Queen: Beanblossom enters Julie in the "Miss Real Estate" beauty contest without her knowledge, forcing Mr. Thackery to hire a temporary secretary. It turns out that the young woman has plenty of experience, but none of it is related to typing or stenography.

The Boat: Beanblossom gets mixed up with mobsters wanted by the FBI when he unknowingly sells them a cabin cruiser for cash. Counting the money with Julie reveals that the buyers have overpaid, encouraging the pair to make an unexpected visit.

Big Crush: The sweetheart of an important client's son develops a schoolgirl crush on Beanblossom when she interviews him for a homework assignment. Her boyfriend is furious about his new competition and gives Mr. Thackery an ultimatum.

I Married Joan, Volume 1 (ALP 4894D): Life is a piece of wedding cake for Judge Stevens (Jim Backus) and his scatterbrained wife Joan (Joan Davis) in these hilarious episodes of "I Married Joan!" CBS had Lucy, but NBC had Joan Davis and her wonderful brand of physical, knock-about comedy from 1952 to 1953. Each week, kindly Judge Bradley Stevens counsels folks in domestic court by using examples from his own married life. Joan Davis, a comedic veteran of vaudeville and a long career in films, brings her inimitable comic timing and charm to each of their wonderful misadventures!

Talent Scout: Joan gets suckered by two phony "Hollywood" talent agents and the judge lets her get taken - all the way to the set of a TV show, as bait to catch them red-handed!

Bad Boy: The Stevens get a crash course in parenting when they take a juvenile delinquent into their home for a week!

Honey-Moon: Judge Stevens relates his own disastrous honeymoon to a couple contemplating divorce!

Neighbors: Joan takes matters into her own hands when partying neighbors keep her up all night!

Sister Pat: Joan's teenage sister moves in and takes over the house, so Bradley gets even by inviting all of his cousins over - as many as he can afford to hire, that is!

Life of Riley / Our Miss Brooks (ALP 5296D): The Life of Riley: William Bendix delighted radio and TV audiences with his lovable but thickheaded Chester A. Riley, an aircraft riveter frequently outsmarted by his wife Peggy (Marjorie Reynolds) and their children, Babs and Junior (Lugene Saunders and Wesley Morgan). This uproarious 1953-57 series from Desilu ("I Love Lucy") is a must for any fan of vintage '50s situation comedy. This DVD includes two episodes - "Bab's School Reunion" and "Riley's Operation." Episodes originally aired 1953-1957.

Our Miss Brooks: Eve Arden scores straight A's as the acid-tongued high school English teacher who continually clashes with her long-suffering principal (Gale Gordon) while carrying a torch for the biology instructor. Miss Connie Brooks and her comic antics kept TV audiences in stitches from 1952 until 1957 after a successful radio run that had started in 1948. This DVD includes two episodes - "The Jump" and "Home Cooked Meal." Episodes originally aired 1952-1957.

The Trouble with Father, Volume 1 (ALP 4782D):Trouble comes in all shapes and sizes in this hilarious situation comedy series starring Stu and June Erwin! The real-life husband and wife team had been acting together for years when they began this series in 1950. Stu plays Principal Erwin of Hamilton High School and does his best to raise daughters Joyce (Ann Todd) and Jackie (Sheila James). Along with handyman Willie (Willie Best), the Erwins discover that it's the little things in life that go from bad to worse. This collection of early episodes also includes rare vintage commercials, some of which feature the cast themselves!

Many Happy Returns: Stu juggles trouble when he decides to install a home burglar alarm himself and advises his daughter on first date kissing!

Father's Pet: It's seven days of trouble during "Be Kind To Animals Week" when the Erwins adopt guppies that breed like bunnies!

Spooks: Little sister Jackie causes trouble by spoiling her big sister's teen party when she steals the science lab skeleton! Special guest star Margaret Hamilton appears as Mrs. Bracker.

The Big Game: In an attempt to head-off potential trouble with vandalism at the school before the big football game, Principal Erwin and handyman Willy discover a statue belonging to the rival school in Stu's basement, and must return it before his daughter is blamed!

Product Description:

Enjoy once more the televisual delights that entertained American families of the 1950s, with episodes of classic TV shows that are equal parts uproarious comedy and nostalgic fun. This collection presents 45 episodes from THE JACK BENNY SHOW, YOU BET YOUR LIFE, THE ADVENTURES OF OZZIE & HARRIET, and much more!

Plot Keywords:

Compilation | Made-For-Network TV

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Product Info:

  • UPC: 089218203298
  • Shipping Weight: 0.85/lbs (approx)
  • International Shipping: 10 items

Film Collectors & Archivists: Alpha Video is actively looking for rare and unusual pre-1943 motion pictures, in good condition, from Monogram, PRC, Tiffany, Chesterfield, and other independent studios for release on DVD. We are also interested in TV shows from the early 1950s. Share your passion for films with a large audience. Let us know what you have.