Deana Carter Biography

4 January 1966, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. Something of a latecomer to country music, Carter recorded her 1995 debut album at the age of 29. The daughter of Nashville alumnus Fred Carter Jnr. (a guitarist who played with everyone from Elvis Presley to Simon And Garfunkel to Roy Orbison), Deana abandoned her early attempts to launch a career in music and spent her early twenties working in rehabilitation therapy. She launched her second attempt at a music career in the early 90s, performing in and around Nashville and trying her hand at writing her own material. Early demos of songs such as ‘Turn Those Wheels Around’ and ‘Angel Without A Prayer’ caught the attention of Willie Nelson (another artist with whom Carter’s father had played), and he invited Carter to perform at 1994’s Farm Aid. Her debut for Capitol Records grafted pop influences onto the country singer-songwriter tradition, earning comparisons to the crossover appeal of Dolly Parton or Tammy Wynette. The critical and commercial success of Did I Shave My Legs For This? garnered Carter a Country Music Association Award in September 1997, and spawned the hit singles ‘Strawberry Wine’, ‘We Danced Anyway’, ‘How Do I Get There’, ‘Count Me In’ and ‘Did I Shave My Legs For This?’. Another song ‘Why Don’t You Stay’, co-written with Mike Read, was one of the strongest songs featured in the movie Hope Floats in 1998.

Carter returned to the studio to record a new batch of material for her projected second album, Everything’s Gonna Be Alright. The album fell short of expectations even though it made the higher reaches of the country album chart in the USA, and Carter was released by Capitol Records not long afterwards. She teamed up with her father to record the seasonal album Father Christmas, released by Rounder Records in 2001. Her debut for Arista Nashville, 2003’s I’m Just A Girl, was an uneasy attempt to guide Carter towards the pop market. The follow-up The Story Of My Life was much better, with Carter taking over control of writing and production and fashioning her most cohesive collection since her debut.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Popular Music by Colin Larkin. Licensed from Muze.

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